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Singaporeans don’t like business trips

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Singaporean business travellers are more susceptible to stress caused by work trips than their global peers.

According to a survey by Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT), 67% of local business travellers are put off by the inability to maintain an exercise routine – 14% more than the global average.

Singaporean executives are also more stressed than their global peers when it came to the lack of connectivity (90%), travelling during the weekends (72%) and not being able to eat healthily when overseas (73%).

However, there were some trigger points that were less stressful for Singaporeans than they were for their global counterparts.

Going through customs and security was 8% below the global average of 54%, followed by immigration control (7% below global average of 47%), and delays (5% below global average of 72%).

The survey also found the financial equivalent of lost productivity per trip for Singaporeans was S$651, lower than the global average of S$821, and the global travel stress index for Singapore was 32.5%, 6.5% lower than the global average.

The figures suggest locals may be less susceptible to stress than others in the world, with the report crediting Singapore’s world-class Changi Airport and a higher usage of business and first class by locals (31% versus the global average of 9%) as the reasons behind this.

Globally, lost or delayed baggage scored highest with a 79% stress rating on list of business travel stress factors, followed up poor or no internet connection (77%), flying economy on medium or long haul flights (73%), and delays (72%).

“We will be using the results of the survey to assess the impact of travel-related stress on an organisation’s productivity levels. By quantifying that stress and its cost, we aim to help companies make smarter travel policy decisions,” Vincent Lebunetel, head of CWT Solutions Group for Europe, Middle East and Africa, said.

Companies could then adapt policies which are better aligned to travel frequency or traveler demographics so as to improve traveler well-being, and ultimately benefiting the organisation.

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