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Why Hong Kong hiring managers need to complain less



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It is the job of a hiring manager to help candidates understand what kind of company they’re applying to as much as possible while evaluating if the candidate is a good fit.

But if such messages aren’t properly delivered, candidates maybe be under the impression they are applying for a job at a toxic workplace.

In a post on Hong Kong Discussion Group, local candidates shared their encounters with rude hiring managers who complain for no reason, leaving job applicants speechless and with a bad taste in the mouth.

One commenter said the hiring manager told him he doesn’t want to hire someone who is going to leave after a year. No boss would want to see employees leave after a year, but what is the point of complaining to a job applicant about this?

Such comments would only lead candidates to think the organisation is toxic and has a high turnover rate, which explains why the hiring manager is so wary about disloyal employees.

Another reader of the post shared how a hiring manager went on non-stop for half an hour warning him he does not tolerate office gossip and employees who are irresponsible.

No applicant will admit he or she is a gossiper or loves to dump tasks to others, so what is the point of telling applicants this? Such complaints might give candidates the impression the company has many gossipers and irresponsible employees.

Another way hiring managers are driving candidates away is by telling them about company rules without explaining why it is necessary to have them.

A candidate said the hiring manager told him he would not be allowed to look at his phone during office hours except during lunch time. Additionally, he would have to reply to messages from the company after office hours and during holidays.

Another job seeker shared the human resources department simply told the him employees are not allowed to have breakfast in the office.

Some readers of the post think the hiring managers are doing the right thing by giving the applicants a clear idea of what is expected from them. But many think the words of these hiring manager are too harsh, and will drive candidates away.

The comment from the writer of the original post might say it all: “I am here to try to get a job, not to be lectured.”

ALSO READ: Hong Kong candidate fed up with interviewer dropping the ball

Photo/ 123RF

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