The Inclusion Index is a holistic measure comprised of two parts: the Inclusion Score and the Diversity Score. The Inclusion score is derived from three sections within the questionnaire; the Company Sense of Belonging Score; the Absence of Discrimination Score; and the Presence of Negative Behaviour Score.

Top of the Inclusion Index is Canada, where we can see gender representations at senior levels, (over 40% females), 65% believe that their companies are actively trying to be more inclusive and diverse and supporting all employees regardless of who they are. In terms of behaviours, almost 60% are given opportunities to learn and progress throughout the year, 65% are given the opportunity to work flexibly and 70% are given positive recognition for good work. Of course, there are some negatives that need to be addressed, which include 20% stating that they have been bullied.

For the purpose of this paper, we have ranked the top 10 industries and companies with the Health and pharmaceuticals industry ranking in first place. In this industry, gender representation at senior level is split equally,

59% believe that their companies are actively trying to be more inclusive and diverse and over 65% believe that they are supporting employees regardless of who they are.

In terms of behaviours, almost 56% are given opportunities to learn and progress throughout the year, 56% are given the opportunity to work flexibly and 66% are given positive recognition for good work. 19% stating that they have been bullied.

in the last 12 months at least 25% of employees have been made to feel uncomfortable in their work environment, and over 15% of employees feel that they have been bullied within their organisation.

When we ask people about their experiences in the workplace, over 80% have observed or experienced some kind of discrimination; however, only a small proportion (33%) said that they feel empowered enough to escalate issues to senior management or HR.

Further, when we look into aspects of inclusion, we find that almost half (46%) of people agree that in their company it is a case of ‘who you know’ and not ‘what you know’. These types of statistics illustrate concerns from an employee experience perspective and suggest that further investigation is required to understand why this is perceived within an organisation.

n the past 12 months around the world, 27% of females have felt that they don’t belong in their company. Thirty-four per cent (34%) of females feel emotionally and socially unsupported at work, 38% of males do too. Adverse impacts result in consistent feelings of job anxiety in 35% of females and 37% of males

Our analysis found that in the past year 28% of females and 26% of males have felt uncomfortable in the workplace. Sadly, 19% of females and 18% of males have been bullied or harassed, of which almost 23% is in the 35-44 age group. This behaviour, along with intimidation and pressure, are power dynamics of control. In relation to their roles, almost 30% of women have felt undervalued and 42% believe they have not been given the opportunity to learn and progress in their careers. These Inclusion Index statistics suggest that a large portion of the world’s population experiences adverse working conditions and are prevented from reaching their full potential.

Over a third (34%) of people suffer from a diagnosed health condition, with 39% suffering from an anxiety or stress-related condition and 17% suffering with mental health issues, while 36% suffer from fatigue and 23% from stamina – both common symptoms of mental health. Poor health can make people feel vulnerable enough without feeling additionally victimised by their employer. Only 60% of people with a health condition report having disclosed their health concern to their company. Of those whose company is aware, 20% feel their company is unsupportive.

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