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The formula for success when working from home



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Working from home seems to be the next big thing, what with employers looking to save costs on permanent office space and employees saying that it helps them with a better work-life balance.

So with that, we kick this Friday off with some ideas that you can share with your team on how to boost productivity while working from home – from the position of your chair to the music you listen to, as compiled by Harveys Furniture.

The power of colour

Colour psychologist, Angela Wright, cites the four primary psychological colors: red, blue, yellow and green, and shares how each one can help. “If you’re in a physically demanding job, red is a great productivity booster,” she says, giving the example of jobs that require a lot of physical exertion such as personal trainers.

Meanwhile, blue is good for office workers as it helps in completing administrative tasks or projects that require maximum focus. “Add a splash of orange if you need extra inspiration,” she adds, saying yellow can help innovators and entrepreneurs who are facing brain fatigue.

“Finally, if you thrive in a calm environment, green is the colour for you. It’s great for people who practice yoga or meditation.”

 

Music to improve your mood

The connection between listening to music you like at work and an improved mood is strong, says Teresa Lesiuk, Associate Professor of Music Education at the University of Miami.

Her research shows that listening to that music often produces “mild, positive moods” and being in that frame of mind can be helpful when attempting to get work done.

Fortunately, it’s not just classical music that stimulates productivity. Songs which include sounds of nature can enhance cognitive functioning and improve levels of concentration.

If your work requires you to be more upbeat, you could try listening to music that matches this tempo. Baroque is a good choice if you have a lot of work to get done, but do avoid anything too heavy.

 

Keep it cool

Working in an office day in and day out, we know how difficult it is to get the temperature right and keep everybody happy. Working from home means this is one less thing to worry about – as you are in full control of the thermostat.

Previous studies suggest that the perfect temperature to maximise productivity should be between 20 and 25 degrees Celsius. However, as our bodies are all different, keeping the room at a temperature that’s comfortable for you should do the trick.

 

Feng shui and the art of placement

Feng shui teaches us how to position objects in the space around us to balance energy and create harmony, and for those working from home, the advice is to separate your working and living space to encourage a good ‘work and home life’ balance.

Feng shui expert, Priya Sher, shares how to position your furniture: “Avoid the sofa, as this provides a space that can energetically separate your living and working life. Position your desk so that the back of your chair has the support of a solid wall.

 

“It’s also a good idea to avoid sitting with your back to the window or open shelves. According to Feng Shui, open shelves act as arrows in your back and a window in your back can make you feel unsupported.”

Other things to consider include the amount of clutter around you. “Avoid placing work files and paperwork on the floor as it signifies a deterioration of your business/career. Also, avoid working from the bedroom.”

All images / Harveys Furniture



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