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Flexible working in APAC

The state of flexible working in 12 countries, including China, Singapore

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Does your company offer flexible working? No, say less than one in five (15%) respondents from China, proving that such arrangements are more popular than expected. In comparison, Singapore has some catching up to do, with 29% saying their employer doesn’t offer flexible working.

Currently, nearly two thirds of the global workforce take advantage of anywhere working. Compared to May 2012, when only 14% benefitted from remote working, this is relatively fast shift in working culture.

Polycom’s new research of 24,000 respondents across 12 countries, including China, Singapore, and Japan, found that almost 60% of workers in Singapore, Australia, and India are working flexibly on a frequent basis.

flexible working in 12 countries

In China, 85% of people surveyed said their company offered flexible working arrangements with 87% stating they work with a colleague located in a different office. Japan was the only country that deviates from the global anywhere working trend.

Mei Lin Low, director, APAC solutions marketing, Polycom commented, “Flexible working is becoming business-normal; employees expect it and employers need to establish flexible working policies to attract and retain their best talent.”

A closer look at Singapore

When it comes to Singapore, only half of the 2,000 respondents surveyed are working flexibly, while 67% admitted said they’d feel more confident working flexibly if they knew that the same policy was applicable to everyone across the company.

From a lifestyle point of view, taking care of children (37%) and having more time to exercise (31%) are top reasons people like to have the option to work anywhere in Singapore. This comes as no surprise, given that long working hours are often cited as being a barrier to work/life balance in the city state.

Toh Hwee Tin, director of NTUC’s Women and Family Unit advised: “To encourage a family-friendly work culture, the responsibility shouldn’t just lie with the human resource department but it should be championed by the company’s leadership and embraced company-wide.” .

flexible working across job levels

Lead Photo/StockUnlimited
Infographics/Polycom

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