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7 interview questions candidates should be asking

You may be used to asking all the questions during an interview, but what the candidates themselves ask may give you better insights as to whether they’re the best possible hire.

The interview and recruitment process is no doubt a tedious one, and with so many check boxes to tick during your first face to face meeting with a candidate, it’s easy to forget a good fit goes both ways.

Here are seven questions candidates should be asking you during a job interview.

“Why did you join this company?”

Except for the receptionist they met at the door, chances are you’re probably the only current employee the candidate gets to meet during this interview. This question helps give them a better idea of what drove you to join the organisation, as well as a feel of the company’s culture and working style.

“How can I help you get your next promotion?”

This question displays the potential employee’s ability to think as a team, and shows they have the group’s overall success in mind.

“Why did the previous employee in the role I’m interviewing for leave?”

This might be a tricky question to answer, but transparency is important if you want this hire to be a success. Be as honest as you can, and providing the candidate with an idea of the job scope and challenges they face will help them make sure they’re not overwhelmed in their first few months.

If this is a role that’s been newly created, share why the company saw a need for the new position, and ask the candidate how they think their new role will contribute to the company.

“Which competitor are you most worried about and what are the company’s immediate plans to stay ahead of them?”

It’s no secret every company faces competition, but wanting to know how your organisation plans to stay one step ahead shows strategic and long term thinking skills – good traits you’d want in your next hire.

“How transparent is the company with data, such as financials and strategy, with employees?”

Especially with younger employees, transparency is very important as staff want to know where they stand in the bigger picture. While it doesn’t make sense to share any of these information during a job interview, be as candid as you can about what the hire can expect to know if they do get the job.

“What professional development can I expect at this organisation?”

Career development is one of the biggest drivers of engagement amongst employees, so it should be no surprise this question pops up. Let the candidate know what some of the training and development programmes offered at the company are, how many training hours they’re expected to clock and the format of training provided.

“What are my KPIs for the first three months?”

This shows the candidate is already thinking about how he can be most productive and efficient in his first 100 days – a crucial time when it becomes clear if the hire is going to pay off or not.

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